Skip to content

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

A Holistic Approach to Treatment

If you’re seeking relief from depression, OCD, and more, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) offers hope for healing. TMS is a non-invasive and evidence-based therapy that uses magnetic pulses to stimulate specific areas of the brain associated with mood regulation. We’re proud to offer this cutting-edge treatment that transforms lives and gives clients renewed possibilities for a brighter future.
No data was found

What is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or TMS?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an FDA-approved procedure that has been proven to help treat depression, OCD, PTSD, chronic pain, anxiety, and bipolar disorders. TMS uses a magnetic field similar to that used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to stimulate the brain’s dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which plays a key role in mood.
No data was found

What is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an FDA-approved procedure that has been proven to help treat depression, OCD, PTSD, chronic pain, anxiety, and bipolar disorders. TMS uses a magnetic field similar to that used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to stimulate the brain’s dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which plays a key role in mood.

What Does TMS Treat?

Treatment-resistant depression and other mood disorders
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

How does TMS work?

TMS converts electricity into a magnetic field via a magnetic head which is placed against the scalp. Only a small portion of the brain is affected; the targeted region relates to the condition being treated. TMS increases connectivity between nerves in the brain, neural activity, and the number of neurotransmitters like serotonin. The increased activity of neurons in this area of the brain lessens depression. Having your brain stimulated by a magnetic field may sound scary, but the experience isn’t painful or uncomfortable. Some people become more positive and sociable after a course of TMS, a difference you don’t see with antidepressants. When used to treat depression, the effects are gradual, and while it can be effective for many individuals, it may not work for everyone.
No data was found

What Does TMS Treat?

While initially found to be beneficial for those who didn’t respond to multiple trials of medication, or who have experienced intolerable side effects, TMS can be also be viewed as a natural, holistic approach to treating depression. TMS offers hope to the estimated 30 percent of people who suffer from depression but can’t find adequate relief. It has been shown to help those who have been diagnosed with:
Treatment-resistant depression
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Chronic pain
Anxiety
Bipolar disorders
TMS is not recommended for people with poorly controlled seizures, a metallic implant close to the head, a brain tumor or disease, or a substance abuse disorder.

What Does a TMS Session Look Like?

TMS is typically given daily, from 10 to 30 sessions total. Sessions take about 30–40 minutes, during which you are fully awake and sitting in a comfortable chair—you can speak, read, or watch TV. After treatment, daily activities may be resumed immediately and without restrictions. For those desiring quick and effective sessions, 3-minute treatments are available at our clinic and are cleared by the FDA. You’ll likely receive 30 treatments for six weeks during the first phase. The doctor will place a TMS coil on the top left side of your head The coil will deliver stimulation for about 4 seconds, stop for about 15 seconds, then start again This cycle repeats about 75 times per session, shorter for 3-minute sessions. During stimulation, you’ll experience a tapping sound and feeling on your scalp Research shows that regular TMS helps prevent recurrence and reduces symptoms should depression reoccur. After the initial phase of about 30 treatments, your doctor will tailor the frequency to meet your needs, gradually decreasing them. You may get treatments every other week, monthly, or every two months.

Are There Any Side Effects?

TMS has few side effects, the most frequent being a mild headache. Even this is uncommon and can be treated with Advil® or Tylenol®. A more severe side effect is the increased risk of seizures. Therefore, those with a seizure disorder are not good candidates for TMS.

Our Therapists

Therapy Groups

More Articles